Energy Efficiency


Clean technologies also include the range of energy efficiency (EE) measures and tools. The cheapest and cleanest electricity is that which is never produced, otherwise known as the negawatt. A negawatt is energy not consumed, either by using more efficient appliances and machines, or through better management and controls, or potentially through demand response efforts.

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the utilities both have a variety of energy efficiency programs, as does the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA). The NYSERDA programs are paid for by NY’s Clean Energy Fund, which is financed by a small surcharge on all electricity bills. Utilities are required to implement efficiency programs via their Energy Efficiency Transition Implementation Plans (ETIPs) and then recover costs from ratepayers. This is an appropriate approach because evidence shows that these efficiency programs also reduce costs for ratepayers and society as a whole.

More efficiency and conservation reduces the demand for electricity, which translates to lower prices for consumers and less of an impact on the environment. In every sector - residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation - there are remaining opportunities to increase efficiency and conservation and reduce overall energy use.


The opportunity for cost-effective energy efficiency savings remains relatively untapped, and ACE NY works with our member organizations and companies to promote more aggressive efficiency programs in New York. This also includes work in the Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) proceeding to find mechanisms to incentivize energy efficiency or build markets for efficiency that do not rely on these other mandatory programs.